Cities

Beldersay

Beldersay

Beldersay Mountain Valley is one of the most picturesque places in the Chimgan Valley. In winter a ski slopes, more prolonged than Chimgan one, operates here. There are cableways that transport tourists to the slopes. On a picturesque hillside thick snow cover lasts from November to April. Beldersay is considered as a ski center of the world class. Tourists ski and snowboard here. From "Cumbel" ski slopes there is a great view of snowy peaks, green valleys and sparkling mountain streams.

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Chimgan

Chimgan

Chimgan is a ski resort located in a mountain range named Tian Shan, near Chirchiq, Uzbekistan.The tourist skiing complex Chimgan is located 85 km (52.8 mi) away from Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, in the spurs of Chatkal ridge on the height of 1,600 metres (5,249 ft), in the Western Tien Shan mountains, surrounding Tashkent from the East. There are hotel complexes and cottages in this ski center.

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Urgench

Urgench

Urgench is a city (1999 pop. 139,100) in southern Uzbekistan. It is the capital of the Khorezm Province, on the Amu Darya River and the Shavat canal. The city is situated 450 km west of Bukhara across the Kyzyl Kum Desert. The history of the city goes back to the second half of the 18th century. The city should not be confused with the city of Konya-Urgench (also known as "Old Urgench" or "Gurgench") in Turkmenistan.

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Namangan

Namangan

Namangan is a city in eastern Uzbekistan, on the northern edge of the Fergana Valley, about 430 km east of Tashkent, about 65 km west of Andijan, and about 75 km north of Fergana. The Koradaryo and Naryn rivers join together to form the Syr Darya just outside the southern edge of the city.

 

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Kokand

Kokand

Kokand is a city in Fergana Province in eastern Uzbekistan, at the southwestern edge of the Fergana Valley. It has a population of 192,500 (1999 census estimate). Kokand is 228 km southeast of Tashkent, 115 km west of Andijan, and 88 km west of Fergana. It is nicknamed “City of Winds”, or sometimes “Town of the Boar".

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Andijan

Andijan

Andijan is the fourth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and the capital of the Andijan Province. It is located in the east of the country in the Fergana Valley, near the border with Kyrgyzstan on the Andijan-Say River. It has a population of 323,900 (1999 census estimate).

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Termez

Termez

Termez is a city in southern Uzbekistan near the border with Afghanistan. The city was named by Greeks who came with Alexander the Great. Termez means in Greek "hot" or "hot place" (Thermo or Thermos). It is still the hottest point of Uzbekistan. It has a population of 140,404 (1 January 2005), and is the capital of the Surxondaryo

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Nukus

Nukus

City in western Uzbekistan, capital of the Karakalpakstan Autonomous Republic, in the delta of the Amu Darya River. Nukus is about 1255 km (about 755 mi) west of Tashkent, Uzbekistan's capital, and about 230 km (about 140 mi) south of M?ynoq and the former shoreline of the Aral Sea.

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Navoi

Navoi

Originally known as Kermine ("Karmana") under the Bukharan Emirate, the city was re-founded in 1958, when it was known under the Russian name of Sokolov. The city is now named after the great Uzbek poet and statesman Alisher Navoi, who wrote in Persian and Chaghatai at the court of Emir Husein Boykara (or Husayn Bayqaro) in Herat.

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Ferghana

Ferghana

Just as Uzbekistan is the heart of Central Asia, the Fergana Valley is the heart of Uzbekistan. Over seven million people, about a third of the population, live in this fertile flood plain of the Syr Darya. The town of Ferghana has grown into the Ferghana valley's third-largest city, with population of 220,000. Founded in 1876,20 kilometers from the ancient town of Margilan, it was christened

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Shakhrisabz

Shakhrisabz

Timur's hometown Shakhrisabz is a small town south of Samarkand. By the time of birth of Timur on 9 April 1336 at the village of Hoja Ilghar, 13 km to the south from Kesh (former name of Shakhrisabz), Kesh was ruled by the Barlas clan, Mongols of the Chaghatai khanate, turkicised by their long stay in the fertile Kashkadarya valley. Using his Barlas lineage, Tamerlane gathered a band

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Khiva

Khiva

Khiva is the most intact and most remote of Central Asia's Silk Road cities, the final destination of a trip back through the centuries from socialist Tashkent to medieval slave town. Where Samarkand leaves the imagination exhausted, Khiva's khanate romance is plain to see and where Urgench lies restricted to two dimensions, Khiva revels in all four, as visions of the past float through its narrow streets like superimposed film.

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Khorezm

Khorezm

Khorezm has a very long history, only a few civilizations could be compared with it. Hundred years before the Great Silk Road appeared, ancient Khorezm had had links with Europe and the East, with Siberia and southern civilizations. It is a cradle of three civilizations formed in Uzbekistan.The Khorezm Khanate was very famous in the fourth century, BC. It was very powerful state.

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Bukhara

Bukhara

The traditional founder of Bukhara has always been the Persian prince Siyavush who built a citadel here shortly after marrying the daughter of Afrosiyab in Samarkand, but its growth has for centuries depended largely upon its strategic location, uniquely placed on the crossroads to Merv, Gurganj, Herat, Kabul and Samarkand.. The early town was taken by the Persian Achaemenids in th

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Samarkand

Samarkand

Samarkand is the mirror of the World, the Garden of the Soul, the Jewel of Islam, the Pearl of the East, the Center of the Universe. Lying in the river valley of the Zerafshan and flanked by Pamir-Altai mountain spurs, this fabled oasis at the fringes of the Kyzyl Kum desert has never lacked breathless admirers. Another name, City of Famous Shadows, reveals Samarkand as witness to

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Tashkent

Tashkent

Tashkent - the capital of Uzbekistan and Central Asia's premier metropolis, betrays little of its 2,000-year history as a crossroads of ancient trade routes. This modern city of 2.1 million people, the fourth largest in the CIS after Moscow, St. Peterburg and Kiev, holds much to arrest the curious traveler, from imposing squares, monumental architecture and fine museums, to the mud-brick 

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