About Uzbekistan

Kurash
07 July 2017
Kurash

Kurash (translated as “attaining a goal by fair means”) is a kind of national waist belt fight, traditional among the Turkic peoples officially included in the world’s network of non-Olympic sports and supported by UNESCO. This kind of single combats originated in the territory of Uzbekistan presumably about 3,500 years ago. In the ancient legendary epos Alpomysh, kurash is mentioned as the most popular and favorite kinds of single combat. Whereas historian and philosopher Herodotus in his work “History”, described kurash in detail among other customs and traditions of ancient Uzbekistan.

Avicena considered this kind of single combats salubrious not only for body but also for spirit, while Tamerlane introduced kurash to his fitness and self-protection program, developed for the soldiers of his unconquerable troops. Furthermore certain battles were preceded by straight fights: where fighters of the feuding parties met. There were cases when upon such straight fights the commanders ceased hostilities and canceled the battle. Kurash was not only a kind of single combats but also public entertainment during various events and festivities. Years went by, but kurash did not lose its national popularity, being one of the most favorite and respected traditions among the Uzbekistan’s peoples.

Over a number of centuries the kurash rules, as well as technique, traditions and philosophy were passed from generation to generation. But no attempts to systematize as well as generalize the whole information on kurash were made; indeed, each family anyway has all necessary knowledge about it. And what is more, kurash never spread beyond Central Asia. It was not until 1980 when Komil Yusupov, kurash, judo and sambo master, began studies which ten years later resulted in making universal rules. The millennial traditions which were thoroughly studied served as a basis to determine weights, terminology, jests, fight duration, uniforms for fighters and referees. Everything that was essential to turn an ancient folk entertainment into a modern kind of sport was worked out.

Kurash, UzbekistanKurash uniform includes wide white trousers and a loose shirt. An imprescriptible part of the uniform is a fabric belt used for comfortable hold of the rival. The girdle made of soft fabric measures 180–220 cm long and 50–70 cm wide. The main kurash rules are rather simple. The competitions are held on a special mat with thickness at least 5 cm, with a marked working zone (located in the center), protective zone and with a “passive zone” separating them. Two participants meet in the working zone. The only position permitted for the combat is a standing stance. The aim set before the contestants is to throw the rival on the back; this result in kurash is considered a victory by fall. To achieve the goal the fighters are allowed nothing but dashes and undercuts to be assessed by the judges. Kurash is a safe and simple combat sport since any painful, beating and submission holds, grips below the belt are prohibited there. In spite of these prohibitions the straight fights are very dynamic and theoric.

Kurash has embodied a centuries-long philosophy and such values as respect to the rival and humanism, honesty and ability go all the way. This kind of single combat is one of the youngest international sports; it starts gaining popularity all over the world. Kurash world championships as well as those of Russian and European take place on a regular basis. The International Kurash Association with the participation of representatives from 28 countries from Asia, Africa and Europe was founded in 1998 and which has been functioning up to date.

More news about Uzbekistan
Tea ceremony

Uzbek people like to drink tea very much. This is not just a simple fact about statement of devotion of one country population, because Uzbek people's love for tea is something different than German's love to beer or Finn's love to coffee

07 July 2017
Kupkari

Kupkari (ulak, buzkashi) is a traditional Central Asian team competition played on horseback. In Turkic “kup” means “many” and in Persian “kari” means “work, case”, hence “kupkari” is “the case of many people”.

07 July 2017
Uzbek costume

Traditional costume in Central Asia remains an important component of cultural, ethnic and religious identity, although younger people ape western fashions. The most striking piece of male attire is the long, striped, wrap-around cloak called  chapanor khalat in Russian, tied around the waist by a turma sash.

07 July 2017
Did you know?

Uzbekistan is one of only two countries in the world to be ‘double landlocked’ (landlocked and totally surrounded by other landlocked countries). Liechtenstein is double landlocked by 2 countries whilst Uzbekistan is surrounded by 5!

Did you know that Uzbekistan lies in the very heart of Eurasia, the coordinates for Uzbekistan are 41.0000° N, 69.0000°

Uzbekistan is home to the Muruntan gold mine, one of the largest open pit gold mines in the world! The country has 4th largest reserves of gold in the world after South Africa, USA and Russia

Uzbekistan is the world capital of melons. They have in excess of 150 different varieties, which form a staple part of the local diet, served fresh in the summer and eaten dried through the winter.

It is Uzbek tradition that the most respected guest be seated farthest from the house’s entrance.

Tashkent’s metro features chandeliers, marble pillars and ceilings, granite, and engraved metal. It has been called one of the most beautiful train stations in the world.

The Uzbek master chef is able to cook in just one caldron enough plov to serve a thousand men.

When you are a host to someone, it is your duty to fill their cups with for the whole time they are with you.  What you must not do, however, is to fill their cup more than half-full.  If you do that as a mistake, say it is a mistake immediately.  Doing it means you want them to leave.  Wow!  Amazing, right?

To Uzbeks, respect means a whole lot.  For this reason they love it if, even as foreigners, you endeavour to add the respectful suffix opa after a woman's name; and aka after a man's.  Example: Linda-opa and David-aka.  You could also use hon and jon respectively.

Having been an historic crossroads for centuries as part of various ancient empires, Uzbekistan’s food is very eclectic. It has its roots in Iranian, Arab, Indian, Russian and Chinese cuisine.

Though identified with the Persia, the Zoroastrism probably originated in Bactria or Sogdiana. Many distinguished scholars share an opinion that Zoroastrianism had originated in the ancient Khorezm. Indeed, today in the world there were found 63 Zoroastrian monuments, including those in Iran, India, Afghanistan and Pakistan. Thirty-eight of them are in Uzbekistan, whereas 17 of these monuments are located in Khorezm.

One of Islam's most sacred relics - the world's oldest Koran that was compiled in Medina by Othman, the third caliph or Muslim leader, is kept in Tashkent. It was completed in the year 651, only 19 years after Muhammad's death. 

Tashkent is the only megapolis in the world where public transport is totally comprised of Mercedes buses. And due to low urban air polution it is one of the few cities where one can still see the stars in the sky.

You would be surprised to know that modern TV was born in Tashkent. No joke! The picture of moving objects was transmitted by radio first time in the world in Tashkent on 26 of July 1928 by inventors B.P. Grabovsky and I.F. Belansky.

Uzbekistan is the only country in the world all of whose neighbours have their names ending in STAN. This is also the only country in Central Asia that borders all of the countries of this region

Uzbeks are the third populous Turkik ethnicity in the world after Turks and Azeris (leaving both in Azerbaijan and Iran)

Did you know that there was silk money in Khiva? Super interesting right? Of course, but the best part of having silk money was that it could be sewn into your clothing.

Famous Islamic physician Ibn Sina (Avicenna in the Latin world) who was born near Bukhara was the one of the first people to advocate using women’s hair as suture material – about 1400 years ago.

Uzbekistan has a long and bloody history. The most notorious leader of Uzbekistan was Timur (or Tamerlane) who claimed descent from Genghis Khan. His military campaigns have been credited for wiping out some 5% of the world’s population at the time.

If you have thought that some of the Islamic architecture in Uzbekistan resembles that from Northern India, then that is because Timur’s great great great Grandson, Babur Beg, was the founder of the Moghul Empire that ruled much of India for almost four centuries! Babur’s great great Grandson was Shah Jahan, who built the Taj Mahal.

Exchange rates
100 RUR
13738.85 UZS
100 USD
809200.36 UZS
100 EUR
953885.55 UZS
100 GBP
1086594.59 UZS
Weather in cities
Tashkent
+
Samarkand
+